Sewer and Septic Maintenance and Repair

Having your sewer line or septic system cleaned is one of the most overlooked home maintenance tasks.

Sewer and Septic Maintenance and RepairAll household drains meet below the house in the main drain that carries the wastewater to the municipal sewer lines or to a septic system. As new water enters the tank, it displaces the water that's already there. This water flows out of the septic tank and into a drain field. A drain field is where a pipe is buried and filled in with gravel. Trust us, it’s important to stay on top of your maintenance!

According to the EPA, "the average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Alternative systems with electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be inspected more often, generally once a year." Regular maintenance fees of $250 to $500 every three to five years is a bargain compared to the cost of repairing or replacing a malfunctioning system, which can cost between $3,000 and $7,000 for a conventional system. Alternative systems can cost even more. The frequency of pumping required for each system depends on how many people live in the home and the size of the system.

A sewage backup is normally caused by a blockage somewhere in the line. Unmanaged pipes will push unfiltered water back up the line, into your home. There are few things worse than watching as wastewater runs down your towels, filling bathtubs and sinks, ruining carpets and causing water damage.

Additionally, household wastewater contains disease causing bacteria and viruses and high levels of nitrogen and phosphorus. Insufficiently treated sewage from septic systems can cause groundwater contamination, which can spread diseases in humans and animals. Improperly treated sewage poses the risk of contaminating nearby surface waters threatening swimmers with various infectious diseases, from eye and ear infections to acute gastrointestinal illness and hepatitis.

Toilets aren’t trash cans!

Your sewer line or septic system is not a trash can. Here's an easy rule of thumb: do not flush anything besides human waste and toilet paper. The following are especially bad for sewer lines and septic systems:

  • Cooking grease or oil
  • Baby and so-called "flushable" wipes
  • Feminine hygiene products
  • Condoms
  • Dental floss
  • Paper towels
  • Prescription medications

A foul odor is not always the first sign of a malfunctioning sewer line or septic system. If you see a sinkhole, an increase in pests, and/or wastewater backing up into household drains, then you might have a problem. Don't delay, give us a call today. Balanced Plumbing has 24/7 Emergency Service!